Know Your Sources: Breaking Down Journal Reviews

By Stephanie Campbell, MLIS

shutterstock_406713271Journal reviews have long been a staple of materials selection, helping librarians decide how to spend their precious resources. It’s extremely important to understand what types of materials journals cover, in what quantities and when, in order to capture the most timely, relevant, and vetted materials your patrons will want to borrow.

For adult selection, everyone knows the heavy hitters are Booklist, Kirkus Reviews, Library Journal, Library Journal Prepub Alert, and Publishers Weekly. For teen selection, Booklist, Kirkus Reviews, School Library Journal, and VOYA are the most dominant. For juvenile selection, the major journals to consult are Booklist, Kirkus Reviews, and School Library Journal.

Though its coverage is considerably smaller, BookPage offers a good representation of key adult titles. The Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books (BCCB) and Horn Book are also smaller, but vital for gaining insight into youth selection.

The chart below shows the approximate number of 2017 reviews, broken down by audience and classification.

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Knowing what your favorite journals cover is only half the picture. You must also be aware of how far in advance materials are reviewed. Staying informed of prepublication titles is crucial to anticipating demand.

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The chart above and table below underscore that the bulk of 2017 reviews appeared within a month or two of a title’s publication. With the exception of adult fiction and some nonfiction (LJ Prepub Alert), it is rare to get more than three months’ advance notice of an important title. It is also interesting to note the number of reviews that appear many months after publication.

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Here’s a quick overview of the main journal sources.

  • Booklist covers titles for all ages from three months prepublication through six months post-publication.
  • BookPage contains primarily adult titles from the current month.
  • Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books focuses on juvenile and teen from one month before, through one month after publication.
  • Horn Book offers juvenile and teen titles from the current month and one month after publication.
  • Kirkus leans more toward adult titles but also has a strong representation of teen and juvenile titles from three months prepublication through six months post-publication.
  • Library Journal is a resource for adult titles from three months prepublication through six months post-publication.
  • Library Journal Prepub Alert focuses on adult titles six months prepublication.
  • Publisher’s Weekly also leans more toward adult titles but also features teen and juvenile titles from three months prepublication through six months post-publication.
  • School Library Journal is for teen and juvenile, three months before through six months after publication.
  • VOYA is for teen, two months before through six months after publication.

shutterstock_437872339Clearly, not all journal sources are created equal. When choosing which journals to consult, it’s important to consider audience, coverage, and timeliness. In general, reviews for adult and juvenile materials outnumber those for teens. Fiction is covered more thoroughly—and sooner—than nonfiction. And some collections such as board books, large print, and Spanish rarely get reviewed. Some of these discrepancies are a simple reflection of the publishing industry (for example, there are far more adult books published every year than there are books for teens).

But journals are just one piece of the collection development puzzle. Bestseller lists, awards, and forthcoming title lists should all be utilized to ensure a well-rounded representation of material. Taking into account sales demand and print run is also a great way to keep up with what’s trending. Combine these with your own personal expertise and you will be well-equipped to make purchasing decisions that will instruct and delight your patrons.

 

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Stephanie

Before joining Brodart in 2016, Stephanie Campbell worked for more than 20 years in public, academic, and special libraries. She is an avid gardener, bicyclist, and kayaker. Click here for more.

The Last Chance Matinee by Mariah Stewart

Book Review by Becky Roupp

Aren’t we always longing to capture a piece of the past? How many of us want to see a vintage item come back to life? The theme is so popular, it’s everywhere, from the books we read, to the latest trend in weddings, to antique cars. last-chance-matinee.png

I was surprised to discover that the first book in Mariah Stewart’s new series is set in the Pocono area, which is very familiar to me and not far from where I live. Hidden Falls, based on a town in which Stewart’s uncle and his family lived, is a town left behind. Stewart is clearly well acquainted with the roads that twist and turn—the ones that seem to be heading nowhere until a town suddenly pops up.

In The Last Chance Matinee, Stewart introduces three very different sisters as the book’s main characters. And here’s the great twist: two of the sisters, Allie and Des, have no idea that their third sister, Cara, even exists. Only when the girls’ father passes away suddenly do the two separate families find out about each other.

The sisters’ inheritance rides on them fulfilling their father’s dying wish: to rebuild the theater in the small Pennsylvania town where he grew up. It’s in awful shape, and these women want to know why their father hid two families from each other. Living and working together allows the sisters to slowly uncover the beauty of the theater, much like the beauty in their increasingly tender relationships.

Will the theatre project be a success? Will the sisters be able to form some sort of bond? And how will they deal with their own demons and the murky past their father has left for them?

Just like Hidden Falls, the small Pennsylvania town where I live has a vintage renovated theatre. The restoration and renovation process that I have witnessed firsthand is painstaking, but the end result is amazing. Every time you walk into the theater and smell the delicious popcorn pouring from the old popcorn maker, buy a dollar soda, and watch the latest blockbuster, you feel like you’ve stepped back in time. My connection with the plot made the story very special for me, but anyone can appreciate the universal themes of family bonds and restoring neglected historic gems.

I love being introduced to a series, finding my interest in and affection for new characters grow as I learn more about them. Stewart slowly peels the layers of characters away, leaving you rooting for the sisters because of their strengths and weaknesses. Stewart does a masterful job of setting the scene. Curling up with The Last Chance Matinee is both satisfying and rewarding. For me, it was like uncovering a jewel as precious as the theatre the Hudson sisters are renovating.

This is the perfect choice for readers of women’s fiction. Fans of Robyn Carr, Debbie Macomber, Viola Shipman will love this book.

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Becky

Since joining Brodart in 2006, Becky has worked with a great variety of libraries, large and small; public, school, and academic. She loves adult fiction and is always eager to find new authors and series to read. Click here for more.